Episodes in the History of Science I (HIST 315)

2021 Spring
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
History(HIST)
3
6.00 / 6.00 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
Harun Bekir Küçük harunkucuk@sabanciuniv.edu,
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English
Undergraduate
SPS102 SPS101
Formal lecture,Seminar
Discussion based learning
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CONTENT

The course will begin with a quick survey of history of science from Antiquity to the present. It will then concentrate on the main aim, which is to try to have a better understanding of the emergence of the new science in central and western Europe following the Renaissance era. What are the cultural and social factors which helped this breakthrough, how did the results affect people's lifestyles and political views, and why did it take so many centuries for the scientific method to penetrate the Ottoman realm? These and other subjects will be discussed in a collective manner, many items will be assigned to students for deeper study, and new findings will bring important contributions to our understanding.

OBJECTIVE

This course is an attempt to furnish the students with a basic literacy in the primary and secondary sources in the history of science. We will be looking at key periods, figures and texts in order to develop a first-order narrative understanding of the history of science while also discussing certain key themes and issues in the historiography of science. The final goal is to situate science, past and present, in the respective societies, cultures and locales where it thrived or survived as a human activity.

LEARNING OUTCOME

Basic literacy in the history and historiography of science from antiquity to the Renaissance.

ASSESSMENT METHODS and CRITERIA

  Percentage (%)
Final 40
Midterm 30
Participation 20
Written Report 10

RECOMENDED or REQUIRED READINGS

Readings

David Lindberg, The Beginnings of Western Science, 2nd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008.
Dimitri Gutas, Greek Thought, Arab Culture. London; New York: Routledge, 1998.
Thomas Kuhn, The Copernican Revolution. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1957 (in print)
Additional primary sources