Science of Nature I (NS 101)

2021 Fall
Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences
Natural Sciences(NS)
4
6.00 / 6.00 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
Aslıhan Muazzez Ünsal -aslihanunsal@sabanciuniv.edu, Emrah Kalemci -ekalemci@sabanciuniv.edu, Durmuş Ali Demir -durmus.demir@sabanciuniv.edu, Ersin Göğüş -ersing@sabanciuniv.edu,
English
Undergraduate
--
Formal lecture,Interactive lecture,On-line task/distance,Recitation,Group tutorial
Interactive,Learner centered,Communicative,Discussion based learning,Simulation
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CONTENT

Science of Nature courses aim to initiate a curiosity and desire for learning ?scientific thinking? in students and at the same time to introduce some of the basic concepts of physical, chemical and biological sciences in connection with questions concerning the universe, nature and our daily life. The NS 101 course consists of two modules ?(1) Are we alone in the universe?? and ?(2) Is antibiotics resistance a big threat to the existence of humankind?? Scientific methodology and fundamental concepts in the physical, chemical, and biological sciences are introduced through an integrated approach in the framework of these questions. Upon completing NS 101, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate skills for critical thinking, reasoning and problem solving through integration of different concepts and information. 2. Distinguish among scientific laws, hypothesis and theory and use them to differentiate facts from fiction. 3. Apply mathematical concepts to solve quantitative problems. 4. Demonstrate fundamental knowledge of the terminology, major concepts and theories of one or more fields in physical, chemical, and biological sciences. 5. Describe the role of science and technology, and develop skills for communicating scientific concepts and facts to society in general. 6. Demonstrate professionalism and ethics when using scientific approach to make informed decision in daily life situations.

OBJECTIVE

Science of Nature courses aim to initiate a curiosity and desire for learning ?scientific thinking? in students and at the same time to introduce some of the basic concepts of physical, chemical and biological sciences in connection with questions concerning the universe, nature and our daily life. The NS 101 course consists of two modules ?(1) Are we alone in the universe? and ?(2) Is antibiotics resistance a big threat to the existence of humankind?? Scientific methodology and fundamental concepts in the physical, chemical, and biological sciences are introduced through an integrated approach in the framework of these questions.

LEARNING OUTCOME

Relate the wide range of scales involved in Nature to familiar objects, and explain in his/her own words how we can investigate the module questions using the Scientific method.
Recognize Earth as a biosphere, and describe its position and motion in a larger structure such as the Solar system, an environment that hosts a habitable planet.
Apply the concept of force and momentum to explain what causes the motions of the planets and what holds the Solar system together, showing all the force vectors correctly.
Explain how the solar system may have formed and evaluate whether our solar system is unique or not.
By providing supporting evidence, describe how molecules of life can be synthesized under conditions similar to those on early Earth.
Relate various types of electromagnetic (EM) waves by giving daily-life examples and discuss how we can use the EM waves to search for extraterrestrial life.
Discuss the seriousness of the antibiotic resistance problem, interpret parameters of population growth models and calculate bacterial growth rates.
Relate the targets of antibiotics in the bacterial cell and the antibiotic resistance mechanisms to replication, transcription and translation of information encoded in the DNA.
Relate the processes of passive (diffusive) and active transport to how drugs move in and out of the bacterial cell.
Relate the effect of molecular interactions on the microscopic scale diffusion of antibiotic molecules in bacteria and evaluate the stability of drug-target interaction.
Examine the three-dimensional structures of molecules relevant to the antibiotic resistance problem, distinguish their bond types and their interactions.
Analyze at atomic scale structures of a given target site and a drug to determine if interactions would be stable, and argue if changes on the binding interface, e.g. due to point mutations, would alter the outcome on the organism scale.
Evaluate whether antibiotic resistance is a big threat for the survival of our species based on an evolutionary biology perspective.

ASSESSMENT METHODS and CRITERIA

  Percentage (%)
Final 27.5
Midterm 27.5
Exam 10
Assignment 10
Participation 10
Team Member Evaluation 1
Homework 15

RECOMENDED or REQUIRED READINGS

Readings

Provided on NS101 SuCourse

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