Comparative Politics (POLS 510)

2019 Spring
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Political Science(POLS)
3
10.00
Özge Kemahlıoğlu -ozgekemah@sabanciuniv.edu,
English
Doctoral, Master
--
Formal lecture,Seminar
Interactive
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CONTENT

This course is designed to introduce the graduate students to the comparative study of politics. The objectives of the course are: 1. To enable students to develop skills in analysing political institutions, processes, and structures through comparisons of political systems embedded in different cultural contexts; 3. To introduce the students to the main issues and topics of the field of comparative politics; and 4. To introduce the students to the analysis of how major human concerns with freedom, social justice, equality, democracy etc. take shape and influence the emerge and structure of political institutions, processes, and practices in different polities.

OBJECTIVE

The objectives of the course are: 1. To introduce students to the ideas of quasi-experimental research and control in political science; 2. To enable students to develop skills in analyzing political institutions, processes, and structures through comparisons of political systems embedded in different cultural contexts; 3. To introduce the students to the main issues and topics of the field of comparative politics; and 4. To introduce the students to the analysis of how major human concerns with freedom, social justice, equality, democracy etc. take shape and influence the emergence and structure of political institutions, processes, and practices in different polities.

LEARNING OUTCOME

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to
a) describe the main objectives of comparative politics
b) identify the major concepts, theories, and approaches in comparative politics
c) comprehend the key issues and themes in comparative analysis

PROGRAMME OUTCOMES


1. Develop and deepen the current and advanced knowledge in the field with original thought and/or research and come up with innovative definitions based on Master's degree qualifications

2. Conceive the interdisciplinary interaction which the field is related with ; come up with original solutions by using knowledge requiring proficiency on analysis, synthesis and assessment of new and complex ideas.

3. Evaluate and use new information within the field in a systematic approach.

4. Develop an innovative knowledge, method, design and/or practice or adapt an already known knowledge, method, design and/or practice to another field; research, conceive, design, adapt and implement an original subject.

5. Critical analysis, synthesis and evaluation of new and complex ideas.

6. Gain advanced level skills in the use of research methods in the field of study.

7. Contribute the progression in the field by producing an innovative idea, skill, design and/or practice or by adapting an already known idea, skill, design, and/or practice to a different field independently.

8. Broaden the borders of the knowledge in the field by producing or interpreting an original work or publishing at least one scientific paper in the field in national and/or international refereed journals.

9. Demonstrate leadership in contexts requiring innovative and interdisciplinary problem solving.

10. Develop new ideas and methods in the field by using high level mental processes such as creative and critical thinking, problem solving and decision making.

11. Investigate and improve social connections and their conducting norms and manage the actions to change them when necessary.

12. Defend original views when exchanging ideas in the field with professionals and communicate effectively by showing competence in the field.

13. Ability to communicate and discuss orally, in written and visually with peers by using a foreign language at least at a level of European Language Portfolio C1 General Level.

14. Contribute to the transition of the community to an information society and its sustainability process by introducing scientific, technological, social or cultural improvements.

15. Demonstrate functional interaction by using strategic decision making processes in solving problems encountered in the field.

16. Contribute to the solution finding process regarding social, scientific, cultural and ethical problems in the field and support the development of these values.


1. Develop the ability to use critical, analytical, and reflective thinking and reasoning 5

2. Reflect on social and ethical responsibilities in his/her professional life. 2

3. Gain experience and confidence in the dissemination of project/research outputs 4

4. Work responsibly and creatively as an individual or as a member or leader of a team and in multidisciplinary environments. 4

5. Communicate effectively by oral, written, graphical and technological means and have competency in English. 5

6. Independently reach and acquire information, and develop appreciation of the need for continuously learning and updating. 5


1. Develop a thorough knowledge of theories, concepts, and research methods in the field and apply them in research design and data analysis. 5

2. Assess the impact of the economic, social, and political environment from a global, national and regional level. 5

3. Know how to access written and visual, primary and secondary sources of information, interpret concepts and data from a variety of sources in developing disciplinary and interdisciplinary analyses. 5


1. Design and model engineering systems and processes and solve engineering problems with an innovative approach.

2. Establish experimental setups, conduct experiments and/or simulations.

3. Analytically acquire and interpret data.


1. Develop, interpret and use statistical analyses in decision making.


1. Begin to grasp historical evolution and contemporary character of world politics. 5


1. Have knowledge of a comprehensive and integrated picture of contemporary Turkey, including all its promise and problems.

2. Have knowledge of an up-to-date grasp of the overall shape and basic outlines of the country?s history; the complexity of the multiple and often contradictory strands of its culture; the fundamental structures and emerging dynamics of its economy; and the basic setting, enduring legacies as well as shifting realignments of its politics.

3. Have a sensitive appreciation of the possible paths and choices it faces early in the 21st century.

4. Able to Respond to the international demand for knowledge about the history, culture, languages, politics and economy of Turkey.

5. Able to Independently formulate critical research questions, and pursue them into a deepening knowledge of the subject.


1. Establish a strong theoretical background in several of a broad range of subjects related to the discipline, such as manufacturing processes, service systems design and operation, production planning and control, modeling and optimization, stochastics, statistics.

2. Develop novel modeling and / or analytical solution strategies for problems in integrated production and service systems involving human capital, materials, information, equipment, and energy, also using an interdisciplinary approach whenever appropriate.

3. Implement solution strategies on a computer platform for decision-support purposes by employing effective computational and experimental tools.

4. Acquire skills to independently explore and tackle problems related to the discipline that were not encountered previously. Develop appropriate modeling, solution, implementation strategies, and assess the quality of the outcome.

ASSESSMENT METHODS and CRITERIA

  Percentage (%)
Midterm 30
Term-Paper 50
Participation 20

RECOMENDED or REQUIRED READINGS

Readings

Recommended Readings:
1. Comparison: Issues and Problems
Sigmund Neumann, "Comparative Politics: A Half Century Appraisal", in Louis J. Cantori, Andrew H. Ziegler, Jr. (eds.) Comparative Politics in the Post-Behavioral Era (Boulder, Colo., Lynne Rienner: 1988): 3-23.
Sydney Verba, "Comparative Politics: Where Have We Been? Where Are We Going?" in Howard Wiarda (ed.), New Directions in Comparative Politics, (Revised Ed.) (Boulder, San Francisco: Westview, 1991): 31-42.
Todd Landman, Issues and Methods in Comparative Politics: An Introduction, (London, New York: Routledge: 2000): 4-19.
David Collier, "The Comparative Method: Two Decades of Change" in Dankwart A. Rustow and Kenneth Paul Erickson (eds.) Comparative Political Dynamics: Global Research Perspectives, (New York, Harper Collins: 1991): 7-31.
Ronald H. Chilcote, Theories of Comparative Politics: The Search for a Paradigm Reconsidered, (2nd Ed.) (Boulder, San Francisco, Oxford: Westview, 1994): 3-54.
2. Comparative Politics: Why Compare?
Mattei Dogan and Dominique Pelassy, How to Compare Nations: Strategies in Comparative Politics, (2nd ed.), (Chatham, New Jersey, Chatham House Publishers, 1990): 3-46.
Giovanni Sartori "Compare Why and How: Comparing, Miscomparing and the Comparative Method" in Mattei Dogan and Ali Kazanc²gil (eds.) Comparing Nations: Concepts, Strategies, Substance (Oxford, Blackwell: 1994): 14-34.
3. Comparative Politics: What to Compare?
Todd Landman, Issues and Methods in Comparative Politics: An Introduction, (London, New York: Routledge: 2000): 38-55..
Ronald H. Chilcote, Theories of Comparative Politics: The Search for a Paradigm Reconsidered, (2nd Ed.) (Boulder, San Francisco, Oxford: Westview, 1994): 55-118.
Mattei Dogan and Dominique Pelassy, How to Compare Nations: Strategies in Comparative Politics, (2nd ed.), (Chatham, New Jersey, Chatham House Publishers, 1990): 111-159.
4. Comparative Politics: How to Compare?
Robert T. Holt and John E. Turner, "Competing Paradigms in Comparative Politics" in Holt and Turner (ed.) The Methodology of Comparative Research. (New York, The Free Press: 1973): 23-71.
Adam Przeworski and Henry Teune, The Logic of Comparative Social Inquiry (New York, J. Wiley: 1970): 17-46.
5. Comparative Politics: Theory, Model and Evidence
Howard Wiarda, "Concepts and Models in Comparative Politics," in Dankwart A. Rustow and Kenneth Paul Erickson (eds.) Comparative Political Dynamics: Global Research Perspectives, (New York, Harper Collins: 1991): 32-53.
Margaret Levi, "A Model, A Method, and A Map: Rational Choice in Comparative and Historical Analysis," in Mark Irving Lichbach and Alan S. Zuckerman (eds.), Comparative Politics: Rationality, Culture and Structure, (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 1997): 19-41.
Ronald H. Chilcote, Theories of Comparative Politics: The Search for a Paradigm Reconsidered, (2nd Ed.) (Boulder, San Francisco, Oxford: Westview, 1994): 121-206.
6. Studying the State
J. P. Nettl, "The State as a Conceptual Variable" in Louis J. Cantori, Andrew H. Ziegler, Jr. (eds.) Comparative Politics in the Post-Behavioral Era (Boulder, Colo., Lynne Rienner: 1988): 303-332. (or see: World Politics, vol. 20: 4 (July 1968) 559-592).
Joel S. Migdal, "Studying the State," in Mark Irving Lichbach and Alan S. Zuckerman (eds.), Comparative Politics: Rationality, Culture and Structure, (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 1997): 208-235.
Joel S. Migdal, "The State in Society," in Howard J. Wiarda (ed.) New Directions in Comparative Politics, (Third Ed.) (Boulder Colorado: Westview, 2002): 63-79.
7. The Individual, Identity and Culture
Marc Howard Ross, "Culture and Identity in Comparative Political Analysis", in Mark Irving Lichbach and Alan S. Zuckerman (eds.), Comparative Politics: Rationality, Culture and Structure, (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 1997): 42-80.
Ronald H. Chilcote, Theories of Comparative Politics: The Search for a Paradigm Reconsidered, (2nd Ed.) (Boulder, San Francisco, Oxford: Westview, 1994): 177-214.
Gabriel A. Almond, "The Intellectual History of The Civic Culture Concept", in Louis J. Cantori, Andrew H. Ziegler, Jr. (eds.) Comparative Politics in the Post-Behavioral Era (Boulder, Colo., Lynne Rienner: 1988): 162-190.
Fred I. Greenstein, "A Note on the Ambiguity of Political Socialization: Definition, Criticisms, and Strategies of Inquiry," in Louis J. Cantori, Andrew H. Ziegler, Jr. (eds.) Comparative Politics in the Post-Behavioral Era (Boulder, Colo., Lynne Rienner: 1988): 190-198.
8. Development and Dependency
Ronald H. Chilcote, Theories of Comparative Politics: The Search for a Paradigm Reconsidered, (2nd Ed.) (Boulder, San Francisco, Oxford: Westview, 1994): 215-283.
Samuel P. Huntington, "Change to Change" in Louis J. Cantori, Andrew H. Ziegler, Jr. (eds.) Comparative Politics in the Post-Behavioral Era (Boulder, Colo., Lynne Rienner: 1988): 355-384.
Joel S. Migdal "Studying the Politics of Development and Change" in Louis J. Cantori, Andrew H. Ziegler, Jr. (eds.) Comparative Politics in the Post-Behavioral Era (Boulder, Colo., Lynne Rienner: 1988): 385-416.
A. H. Somjee, "Non-Western Theories of Development: Critiques and Explorations," in Howard J. Wiarda (ed.) New Directions in Comparative Politics, (Third Ed.) (Boulder Colorado: Westview, 2002): 119-140.
Tony Smith, "The Dependency Approach" in Howard J. Wiarda (ed.) New Directions in Comparative Politics, (Third Ed.) (Boulder Colorado: Westview, 2002): 45-61.
9. Theories of Class
Ronald H. Chilcote, Theories of Comparative Politics: The Search for a Paradigm Reconsidered, (2nd Ed.) (Boulder, San Francisco, Oxford: Westview, 1994): 284-336, 339-366.
Robert Dahl, Who Governs? (New Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. Press, 1961).
C. Wright. Mills, The Power Elite, (London, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, 1956).
10. Social Movements and Social Revolutions
Todd Landman, Issues and Methods in Comparative Politics: An Introduction, (London, New York: Routledge: 2000): 92-117.
Doug McAdam, Sidney Tarrow, and Charles Tilly, "Toward and Integrated Perspective on Social Movements and Revolution", in Mark Irving Lichbach and Alan S. Zuckerman (eds.), Comparative Politics: Rationality, Culture and Structure, (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 1997): 142-175.
Michael Oksenberg and Bruce J. Dickson, "The Origins, Processes, and Outcomes of Great Political Reform," in Dankwart A. Rustow and Kenneth Paul Erickson (eds.) Comparative Political Dynamics: Global Research Perspectives, (New York, Harper Collins: 1991): 235-261.
Klaus von Beyme, "The Modernization of Socialism: Glasnost versus Perestroika," in Dankwart A. Rustow and Kenneth Paul Erickson (eds.) Comparative Political Dynamics: Global Research Perspectives, (New York, Harper Collins: 1991): 262-291.
Nikki R. Keddie, "The Revolt of Islam and Its Roots," in Dankwart A. Rustow and Kenneth Paul Erickson (eds.) Comparative Political Dynamics: Global Research Perspectives, (New York, Harper Collins: 1991): 292-308.
Susan Eckstein, "How Consequential are Revolutions," in Dankwart A. Rustow and Kenneth Paul Erickson (eds.) Comparative Political Dynamics: Global Research Perspectives, (New York, Harper Collins: 1991): 309-351.
11. Democracy: Transition, Consolidation, and Performance
Arend Lijphart, Patterns of Democracy: Government Forms and Performance in Thirty-Six Countries, (New Haven, and London, Yale Univ. Press: 1999): 1-61, 243-300.
Fred W. Riggs, "Conceptual Homogenization of a Heterogeneous Field: Presidentialism in Comparative Perspective", in Mattei Dogan and Ali Kazancigil (eds.) Comparing Nations: Concepts, Strategies, Substance, (Oxford, U.K., Cambridge, USA: Blackwell, 1994: 72-152.
Terry Lynne Karl, "Dilemmas of Democratization in Latin America", in Dankwart A. Rustow and Kenneth Paul Erickson (eds.) Comparative Political Dynamics: Global Research Perspectives, (New York, Harper Collins: 1991): 163-191.
Metin Heper, "Transition to Democracy Reconsidered: A Historical Perspective", in in Dankwart A. Rustow and Kenneth Paul Erickson (eds.) Comparative Political Dynamics: Global Research Perspectives, (New York, Harper Collins: 1991): 192-210.
Peter Lange, Hudson Meadwell, "Typologies of Democratic Systems: From Political Inputs to Political Economy", in Howard Wiarda (ed.), New Directions in Comparative Politics, (Revised Ed.) (Boulder, San Francisco: Westview, 1991): 82-117.
12. Post-Industrial Politics: Culture, Institutions, Ideas and Interests
Peter A. Hall," The Role of Institutions, Interest, and Ideas in the Comparative Political Economy of the Industrialized Nations, " in Mark Irving Lichbach and Alan S. Zuckerman (eds.), Comparative Politics: Rationality, Culture and Structure, (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 1997): 174-207.
Douglas E. Ashford, "Explaining Democratic Welfare States: Supply, Demand and Context" in Dankwart A. Rustow and Kenneth Paul Erickson (eds.) Comparative Political Dynamics: Global Research Perspectives, (New York, Harper Collins: 1991): 355-380.
Jack Hayward, "The Policy Community Approach to Industrial Policy" in Dankwart A. Rustow and Kenneth Paul Erickson (eds.) Comparative Political Dynamics: Global Research Perspectives, (New York, Harper Collins: 1991): 381-407.
T. J. Pempel, "Japan and Sweden: Polarities of Responsible Capitalism ", in Dankwart A. Rustow and Kenneth Paul Erickson (eds.) Comparative Political Dynamics: Global Research Perspectives, (New York, Harper Collins: 1991): 408-438.
Paul S. Adams "Corporatism and Comparative Politics: Is There a New Century of Corporatism?", in Howard J. Wiarda (ed.) New Directions in Comparative Politics, (Third Ed.) (Boulder Colorado: Westview, 2002): 17-44.